NEW TEXTILE BOOK

Double Ocho hat

The architecture of a fibre is like that of the DNA this shows reflective and experiential process in tension,

NEW TEXTILE BOOK

Just produced a book which is an inspirational story of how creativity can help you rise above the everday problems of life.   Attached is a picture of my front cover, my story is told through my hats.  http://www.2QT.co.uk/blog or http://www.toneredgar.com go to the about page to purchase the book.

Loose ends – ANU Nets Project

Thematically I think about a net as a series of connections. In death, (with which I am preoccupied at present) the material connection with the deceased is cut. The link with the person who has died feels tenuous at best. Loose ends abound.

Rachel Bickovsky

Nets Project, ANU Textiles

My work explores family networking. Connections that have been lost, and the ones that remain. The collage is made from four pieces of paper, and a series of small tokens.

The main image is a representation of the ‘Family Tree’. Located on this tree is a series of tokens, each marked with a family member’s name. The branches represent the passages of different connections. As the tokens expand and the connection becomes lost, the token is marked with a question mark (?).

Fishermen’s Pants Embroidery (plus Holstein in a Jar)

I am trying to communicate the plight of the refugee by likening their situation to that of being lured into and entangled in a “net” of nefarious behaviour and political and bureaucratic policy in both their own and the country to which they escape.

I am using the mediums of both drawing and textiles on white muslin, while drawing on inspiration from work by child detainees. I chose muslin for its net-like quality. I am using grayish thread to convey the feeling of waves, pulling and entwining. The use of fishermen’s pants alludes to traditional culture, sea and boats

Hair netted

Paula HIlyard's word at the last meeting

I forgot to add to my previous post, that when I went to the local butcher to buy the skin, I asked for it in metres, and after I had been in for the third time, I was being asked to pay more for the same amount and he was considerably grumpy and unwilling.   So I left it for a few months, and then when I went back – I asked him for it by weight, and with a bright cheery voice he said, “no problems – as much as you like”.    So I guess the  moral to this story is, do not ask a non sewing male for sausage skin in metres!

.

Skin has fascinated me for a long time – a two dimensional multipurpose mesh surfaced organ encapsulating an ample and capacious body.    It can be slack or tight depending on age and weight.   It can be oily or dry, and responds to pain and pleasure.  It is a marvellous material with a network of lines especially on skin dried and damaged by the elements or in my particular case, worn with ageing.   It hides in its multiple layers nerves, glands and capillaries under its inert exterior.

My work is to show a network of lines  – a network of roads travelled  – telling the story of the life lived – through a body that shows the wear and tear of what has been.

Here are photos I have taken of what I have done so far – manipulating sausage    skin.